19 October-30 November 2020
The 51st Union World Conference On Lung Health
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Event

Channel 1
OA-36-The role of pharmacies in the TB cascade of care
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query_builder 12:30 - 13:50 | Event time (GMT+2)
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place Online Session/Virtual
card_travel Oral Abstract session
mic English
OA-36-The role of pharmacies in the TB cascade of care
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12:30 - 12:35: Introduction


12:35 - 12:43: OA-36-721-24-Improving TB case finding through pharmacies using digital tools in Manila City, Philippines Programmatic implementation demonstrating the path of how pharmacy professionals in the community contribute to tuberculosis (TB) case finding through an e-referral tool in the SwipeRx mobile app. It converted a long and tedious paper-based process into a convenient and efficient referral system.

Eden Mendoza-Hisey

12:43 - 12:51: OA-36-722-24-Improving TB preventive therapy data quality in Ethiopia High quality, patient-level data are essential to advance tuberculosis (TB) prevention for people living with HIV. We present results of a data quality improvement initiative for TB preventive therapy initiation/completion, as well as viral load status in electronic medical records, for tracking Ethiopia’s progress toward TB-HIV epidemic control

Biniyam Eskinder

12:51 - 12:59: OA-36-723-24-Treating viral infections and TB with antibiotics in Viet Nam: is there any financial benefits for community pharmacies? This study evaluated the costs of pharmaceutical management of viral infections and tuberculosis in four provinces of Viet Nam using simulated patient survey data. The findings encourage policies that reduce the inappropriate use of antibiotics for viral illnesses in order to reduce patients’ out-of-pocket expense and improve the quality of care in Viet Nam.

Tho Dang

12:59 - 13:07: OA-36-724-24-Engaging private sector drug retailers in Nigeria’s effort to improve TB case identification: screening and diagnostic gaps from mystery client survey in two states Using a mystery client survey methodology, this study examines trained drug retailers’ ability to appropriately identify and manage presumptive tuberculosis (TB) patients in urban Nigeria. Though results reveal minimal unauthorised dispensing of TB drugs, providers missed opportunities for screening and often failed to refer or initiate sputum collection for TB diagnosis.

Sophie Faye

13:07 - 13:15: OA-36-725-24-Exploring the attitudes and practices of pharmacy professionals towards dispensing national TB programme-provided fixed-dosed combinations While fixed-dose combinations (FDCs) for tuberculosis (TB) have been recommended as the standard treatment, Indonesia’s private TB market is dominated by first line, single-formulation drugs. This digital, cross-sectional study explored the pharmacy professional practices and attitudes toward dispensing national TB programme-provided FDCs to increase its availability for patients through pharmacy channels.

Vania Gones

13:15 - 13:23: OA-36-726-24-Assessing antibiotic sales for presumptive and multidrug-resistant TB patients by community pharmacies in Viet Nam: a standardised patients survey The inappropriate use of antibiotics has been a key driver of antimicrobial resistance. We evaluated antibiotics sales in community pharmacies within Viet Na, using a standardised patient survey, for standardised patients presenting with presumptive tuberculosis (TB) and multidrug-resistant TB.

Shukry Zawahir

13:23 - 13:31: OA-36-727-24-The impact of patent medicine vendors in increasing TB case detection among hard-to-reach dwellers in selected districts in Nasarawa State, Nigeria Patent medicine vendors (PMVs) remains a feature of the informal health sector in Nigeria. Previous studies among patients with chronic cough revealed that 60% of respondents seek first level care from the PMVs, hence engaging PMVs promises increased tuberculosis detection. This abstract presents results of our PMV intervention in Nigeria.

Maxwell Onuoha

13:31 - 13:50: Q&A


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