19 October-1 December 2020
The 51st Union World Conference On Lung Health
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Channel 1
OA-12-Confronting TB stigma
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query_builder 12:30 - 13:50 | Event time (GMT+2)
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OA-12-Confronting TB stigma
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12:30 - 12:35: Introduction


12:35 - 12:43: OA-12-569-22-Why is TB called the ‘disease of paper’? Exploring perceptions about the spread of TB in rural South Africa Understanding community perceptions of tuberculosis (TB) spread is valuable to informing clear communication during health visits. People diagnosed with TB can be subjected to ineffective and stigmatising TB infection control practices at home. Health workers need to proactively provide information to families and people diagnosed with TB in order to prevent discrimination.

Helene-Mari Van der Westhuizen

12:43 - 12:51: OA-12-570-22-Characterising TB stigma in the community: a mixed methods study in Cambodia While biomedical approaches, such as case detection and treatment, have contributed substantially to the country's fight against tuberculosis (TB), other social determinants of health, such as stigma, are not well understood in Cambodia. This study aimed to characterise and explore the determinants of TB stigma among people with TB in Cambodia.  

Sovannary Tuot

12:51 - 12:59: OA-12-571-22-TB-related stigma in urban communities in Uganda: what are the predictors? In Ugandan urban communities, tuberculosis (TB) related stigma was higher among TB patients (65.6%) compared to non-TB patients (49.8%). The risk factors included having HIV-related stigma, being below 50 years of age and being a TB patient or a TB patient with low TB knowledge. Stigma reduction interventions should target these for greater impact.

Timothy Kiyemba

12:59 - 13:07: OA-12-572-22-Gender differences in perceived TB stigma in Kampala, Uganda: a cross- sectional analysis Tuberculosis (TB) is stigmatised in many high burden settings. Perceived stigma prevents individuals from engaging with TB diagnostic and treatment services. Men and women may differ in perceptions of, or sensitivity to, TB-related stigma. We conducted a cross-sectional study of perceived TB-related stigma to compare perceptions of TB stigma by gender.

Amanda J Meyer

13:07 - 13:15: OA-12-573-22-A mixed methods assessment of stigma in people living with drug-resistant TB and HIV in South Africa We characterise drug-resistant TB (DR-TB)/HIV stigma among co-infected patients in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, as part of the PRAXIS (Prospective Study of Adherence in M/XDR-TB Implementation Science) study. The drivers and manifestation of internal and enacted stigma attributable to DR-TB and HIV are elucidated, compared and linked, using mixed methods.

Amrita Daftary

13:15 - 13:23: OA-12-574-22-“I hope we can do infection control in a more human way.” Balancing safety and stigma in rural South African health facilities Tuberculosis infection prevention and control (IPC) measures, such as masks and patient separation, may be stigmatising to patients. It is also critical for preventing the spread of TB in health facilities. Developing messaging that clearly explains TB IPC, and which emphasises communal wellbeing and safety, could assist with addressing TB stigma.

Helene-Mari Van der Westhuizen

13:23 - 13:31: OA-12-575-22-Funding human rights programmes in the TB response: the Global Fund experience Stigma and discrimination are most frequently identified human rights barriers to accessing tuberculosis (TB) services. However, there is little understanding of programmes in order to address such barriers and how to integrate those programmes in TB response. The Global Fund is committed to supporting programmes to address access barriers and there will be discussion on the lessons learned.

Hyeyoung Lim

13:31 - 13:39: OA-12-576-22-The development and validation of a scale to measure stigma around, and in people with, drug-resistant TB This is a cross-sectional study, conducted in Viet Nam, which evaluated 45 stigma-related items in order to develop the first multidrug-resistant tuberculosis stigma scale. Exploratory factor analysis was used for item reduction and psychometric analysis was conducted to assess the validity of the remaining 14-item scale. 

Lisa Redwood

13:39 - 13:50: Q&A


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Channel 5
SP-34-Human rights and tobacco: progress and next steps for protecting populations from tobacco industry interference in child health
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query_builder 15:00 - 16:20 | Event time (GMT+2)
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SP-34-Human rights and tobacco: progress and next steps for protecting populations from tobacco industry interference in child health
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This session will focus on how stakeholders in health and human rights can use a human rights based approach to protect children’s rights and accelerate the implementation of tobacco control measures at national level. We will provide practical examples of how to use human rights mechanisms and human rights treaties as well as coordinated campaigns around national reporting obligations to human rights treaties.
 

15:00 - 15:05: Introduction

15:05 - 15:17: Human rights-based approach as the pathway for protecting populations from tobacco industry: global progress and next stepsA human rights approach to ending the tobacco epidemic is unique. It frames the freedom from smoking addiction, and the health harms from tobacco use, as a human right and requires governments to advance human development by implementing measures that decrease use. The Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) has brought significant progress in advancing health, but lacks enforcement mechanisms. Using human rights obligations forces the hands of governments, empowers tobacco control advocates, brings new allies and suggests innovative policy solutions. This presentation will discuss both top-down and bottom-up approaches and illustrates the progress that is being made by advocates around the world. Bottom-up approach involves human rights mechanisms to advance tobacco control by engaging in the reporting processes associated with national human rights treaty obligations. The global top-down approach integrates tobacco control objectives among global human rights bodies as well as collaboration among health and human rights mechanisms.
Laurent Huber

15:17 - 15:29: Human rights reporting and campaigning on tobacco use and imported tobacco in GermanyGermany has not implemented key tobacco control policies and politicians often portray tobacco as an individual lifestyle choice rather than an issue that needs government regulation. By framing tobacco control as a human rights and children‘s rights issue and by using human rights reporting mechanisms, civil society puts pressure on the German government to implement regulatory measures. In 2018, Unfairtobacco started to build the German Network for Children‘s Rights and Tobacco Control, bringing actors from different backgrounds together that had no links to each other before: organisations in public health, human/children‘s rights and development. Because human rights treaties have enforcement mechanisms that are lacking in the FCTC, this angle advances tobacco control advocacy in Germany. With this presentation, we aim to share our experience and, thereby, build the capacity of colleagues on how to use human rights arguments and reporting processes to advance tobacco control in their countries.

Laura Graen

15:29 - 15:41: Reclaiming child rights to health by preventing the tobacco industry from using disruptive tactics to deny rights to be tobacco-freeThe denial of children’s rights is at the heart of the tobacco industry’s interference in health policies. Five of the largest tobacco companies control 80% of the global market, and mergers and acquisitions have solidified interference on an industrial scale. Driven by shareholder demand for profits, the industry needs children to replace the sick, the dying and those that have quit. With no apparent intention of ending their marketing of addictive, lethal products, which kill 8 million people a year, the industry is aggressively releasing new products and using front groups, corporate social responsibility and philanthropy to disrupt tobacco control. While the interference tactics of Big Tobacco are well documented, their misleading concerns about children (while simultaneously denying their rights) demands a more strategic response, with integrated use of treaties and frameworks to protect children.
Anne Jones

15:41 - 15:53: Child labour in tobacco: a violation of human rights and national law in BangladeshThe exploitation of children as labour in tobacco manufacturing is a major problem as both a violation of human rights and the national law in Bangladesh. Avenues to counter child labour exist and will be reviewed along with challenges and opportunities to do more to protect children from tobacco and tobacco industry interference. 
Syed Mahbubul Alam

15:53 - 16:20: Q&A session

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Channel 3
SP-41-Preventing human rights abuses in the digitisation of the TB and COVID-19 responses
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query_builder 11:00 - 12:20 | Event time (GMT+2)
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SP-41-Preventing human rights abuses in the digitisation of the TB and COVID-19 responses
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The digitalisation of the tuberculosis (TB) response is increasing the amount and kind of data produced and used by public and private health officials. Digital tools for active case finding and adherence, as well as artificial intelligence algorithms, are now being repurposed or broadened for use in the COVID-19 response. Lessons from the HIV and TB responses, for protections of privacy and confidentiality and elimination of stigma and discrimination, must be leveraged for COVID-19. This session will examine the normative, legal and technical aspects of using digital technologies in the TB and COVID-19 responses.  

11:00 - 11:05: Introduction

11:05 - 11:17: Big data in the TB and COVID-19 reponses: a neocolonial and human rights analysisWith the advent of big data comes increased potential for exacerbating disparity through data both directly and indirectly. The production of personal data in high tuberculosis (TB) burden countries, in particular, must be considered in light of their colonial histories. Importantly, interventions intended to eliminate TB at global and national levels are ushering in a new era of data commodification, colonisation, and surveillance in the name of public health. This, in turn, raises critical concerns for the human rights of people affected by TB, many of whom belong to vulnerable or marginalised groups. Importantly, examining the relationship between TB, data surveillance and human rights law does more than illuminate potential pitfalls – it also foreshadows possible solutions.
Kat Albrecht

11:17 - 11:29: Watch out for DAT Trojan horse: DATs v. DOT for TB TreatmentThe proliferation of digital adherence technologies (DATs) in the tuberculosis (TB) response is thought to signal a departure from the longstanding approach of directly observed therapy (DOT). But are the two approaches really any different? This talk will consider whether DATs, rather than representing a true break from DOT, are instead a Trojan horse of sorts. That is, do DATs simply prolong the global community’s reliance on an outdated treatment paradigm, while introducing a whole new set of concerns? This question must be considered in light of the fact that DATs will generate massive amounts of personal data of people affected by TB - some of the most vulnerable people in our communities - for use by government and, in some cases, private health authorities.
Brian Citro

11:29 - 11:41: The risks of digitisation for surveillance and contract tracing for TB and COVID-19Apart from debate on COVID-19, conversations on privacy and data protection have gained momentum over the last few months. Questions have arisen on whether strategies to manage COVID-19 have clawed back on gains made in protection of fundamental rights and freedoms especially the right to privacy. Also, whether such strategies have been well thought out and whether they are in proportion in view of their purpose. There is genuine concern that the surveillance mechanisms that have been adopted by states to deal with the pandemic have gone, or will go, beyond their legal purpose. Surveillance mechanisms have gradually moved from physical surveillance by healthcare professionals to surveillance by security agents and digital surveillance using mobile phone data. Hence, there is need to interrogate what form of digital contact tracing would not pose unnecessary risks to the protection and promotion of fundamental rights and freedoms.
Mugambi Laibuta

11:41 - 11:53: Opportunities and risks for digital technologies in TB community-led monitoringThe reliance on comprehensive, high quality and timely data and information on the barriers faced by people affected by tuberculosis (TB) in accessing essential TB services has given rise to the need for community-led monitoring (CLM) of the TB response and digital CLM solutions.  Intended for collecting, exchanging and making accessible data and information about the TB response as evidence for action, the ultimate aim of CLM is to close the gap in the number of people who fail to receive TB care. Ensuring rights and protections of populations engaged in its pursuit is an ethical and programmatic imperative. This talk will consider the opportunities for digital solutions in CLM, the ethical dilemmas that arise in CLM data management and potential solutions.  
Caoimhe Smyth

11:53 - 12:18: Q&A session

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