19 October-1 December 2020
The 51st Union World Conference On Lung Health
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Channel 7
SP-07-Towards new TB vaccines: progress and considerations for introduction
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query_builder 12:30 - 13:50 | Event time (GMT+2)
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SP-07-Towards new TB vaccines: progress and considerations for introduction
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The World Health Organization End TB strategy aims to end the tuberculosis (TB) epidemic by 2035. A new TB vaccine that is safe, affordable and effective in providing protection against all forms of TB in adolescents and adults is critical for rapidly reducing disease incidence and mortality. There are currently promising candidates in the clinical pipeline. However, accelerating progress requires a globally coordinated plan to efficiently streamline the complex approaches to testing and the introduction of new vaccines. This symposium aims to discuss current evidence around the full benefits new vaccines offer, as well as venues needed to accelerate development and to facilitate programmatic implementation.

12:30 - 12:35: Introduction

12:35 - 12:47: World Health Organization preferred product characteristics for preventive and therapeutic vaccinesThis presentation outlines the World Health Organization's (WHO’s) preferred and minimal product characteristics (PPCs) for both preventive and therapeutic vaccines. These PPCs intend to articulate attributes of products, that are suitable for end users, to scientists, funding agencies and industry groups developing TB vaccine candidates intended for WHO pre-qualification and policy recommendations
Ann Ginsberg

12:47 - 12:59: The clinical development pipeline of new TB vaccinesThis presentation will summarise the progress in the clinical development pipeline of new tuberculosis (TB) vaccines and the prospect for their availability and use in countries that need them most. Considering that vaccines potentially offer a novel approach to combat emergence and transmission of anti-TB resistance, this session will also seek to inform the debate on the use of new vaccines in settings with high level of resistance.
Dereck Tait

12:59 - 13:11: A global roadmap for the research and development of new TB vaccinesThis presentation will share findings from the development of a global roadmap for the research and development of new tuberculosis (TB) vaccines, which was launched in 2020. The roadmap articulates elements of need across the clinical development, delivery and implementation of new TB vaccines in the form of research questions, as well as capacity needs with an end-to-end perspective. Crosscutting challenges and opportunities at the scientific, financial, policy, regulatory, manufacturing and access interface will be discussed in this presentation.
Frank Cobelens

13:11 - 13:23: Assessing the full value of new TB vaccines for decision-makingThe introduction of a new vaccine into national immunisation programmes often involves a trade off with investing in other vaccines or alternative strategies. As such, countries need broader information for assessing the comparative health and economic impact of new vaccines before implementation. I will share an update on progress in a project designed to assess the potential health and economic impact of new tuberculosis (TB) vaccines, using various vaccine characteristics and implementation scenarios. The intended goal is to proactively prepare evidence necessary for decision-making by countries, partners and institutions involved in new TB vaccine development and implementation.
Richard White

13:23 - 13:50: Q&A session

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Channel 2
SS-04-Innovative Medicines Initiative Antimicrobial Resistance Accelerator: a new public-private partnership to tackle antimicrobial resistance
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SS-04-Innovative Medicines Initiative Antimicrobial Resistance Accelerator: a new public-private partnership to tackle antimicrobial resistance
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Organised by: Uppsala University and Carlos III University
The Innovative Medicines Initiative (IMI) Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) Accelerator is a recently formed consortium of over 50 partners, unified by a common goal of developing new tools and therapeutics to fight resistant pathogens, with a particular focus on targeting tuberculosis (TB) and Gram-negative bacteria.   The initiative is comprised of three core pillars: COMBINE, a capability building network; ERA4TB, a TB drug development  network; and portfolio building networks that include the projects TRIC-TB and RespiriTB. The scope of the AMR Accelerator is broad;  aiming to consolidate expertise under one structure to tackle AMR and accelerate the progression of antibiotics towards the clinic.

09:45 - 09:55: Innovative Medicines Initiative Antimicrobial Resistance Accelerator: structure and strategy Presentation of the consortium supporting all the projects in the Antimicrobial Resistance Accelerator: COMBINE

Karen O´Dwyer

09:55 - 10:10: The European Regimen Accelerator for Tuberculosis (ERA4TB): concept, vision and progress Presentation of the consortium looking at progressing antitubercular drugs within the Antimicrobial Resistance Accelerator: ERA4TB

Stewart Cole

10:10 - 10:20: Innovative Medicines Initiative Antimicrobial Resistance Accelerator: a new public-private partnership to tackle the antimicrobial resistance issue worldwide: Tric TB Presentation of Tric TB: portfolio building networks of the Antimicrobial Resistance Accelerator.

Michel Pieren

10:20 - 10:30: New approaches to targeting the respiratory chain of M. tuberculosis Presentation of RespiriTB: portfolio building network of the Antimicrobial Resistance Accelerator.

Meindert Lamers

10:30 - 10:45: Q&A session


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Channel 2
SP-22-Advancing a prevention research agenda for TB
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query_builder 16:30 - 17:50 | Event time (GMT+2)
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SP-22-Advancing a prevention research agenda for TB
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Prevention is essential to achieving global targets to end the tuberculosis (TB) epidemic and should be considered an essential human right. In recent years there has been increased focus on advancing research and development of new tools to support TB prevention, including diagnostics to detect latent TB infection, therapeutics to prevent progression to active disease and vaccines to prevent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection or to prevent progression to disease. This session will provide an overview of the status of development of new vaccines, drugs and diagnostics to diagnose and prevent TB disease. A human rights framework for TB prevention will also be presented.

16:30 - 16:35: Introduction

16:35 - 16:47: Prevention through vaccination: advancing research and development of new vaccines to prevent TBVaccines are one of the most successful and effective public health interventions to decrease the spread of life-threatening infectious diseases. Worldwide, incidence and death due to measles, diptheria, influenza, polio, meningitis and numerous other diseases have been greatly reduced through effective vaccines and immunisation programmes. However, BCG, the only licensed vaccine to prevent tuberculosis (TB), has been inadequate in halting the global epidemic. Over the past two decades there has been a significant global effort to develop new, more effective TB vaccines and recent promising results have demonstrated that developing new vaccines is feasible, bringing increased enthusiasm and optimism to the field. This presentation will discuss the latest advances in the research and development of new, more effective vaccines to prevent TB, the potential impact a new TB vaccine could have on TB incidence, and what will be necessary to further advance the TB vaccine pipeline.
Grace Kaguthi

16:47 - 16:59: Diagnosing TB infection to prevent TB: an overview of the landscape of TB infection and incipient TB testsExisting tests for TB infection (TBI), tuberculin skin test (TST) and Interferon Gamma Release Assays (IGRA), have limited value in predicting risk for the progression from infection to active TB. Furthermore, implementation of TBI tests faces operational challenges such as cold chain requirements and needs for sophisticated laboratory infrastructure. Partly as a result of logistic challenges and limitations in their accuracy, TBI tests are not required prior to the start of TB preventive treatment (TPT) in priority risk groups such as people living with HIV and household contacts aged less than 5 years. For others, TBI tests are generally recommended to identify those who benefit most from treatment.  New tests for TBI are emerging such as the C-Tb (Serum Institute of India), Diaskin Test (Generium, Russian Federation) and QFT access (Qiagen, SA). It is important to review the landscape of TBI tests and identify gaps that need to be filled to facilitate development and introduction of new tests.
Morten Ruhwald

16:59 - 17:11: TB preventive therapy: treatment of latent TB infection with a shorter course regimenRoughly one quarter of the world is infected with latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) and treating this population is critical to achieving the end of the TB epidemic. While treatment of active TB has remained a top priority, this strategy alone will not yield the needed results to meet these END TB targets. Current treatments for LTBI can take up to nine months and adherence to such lengthy treatments have proved inconsistent in the past. Newer, shorter-course preventative therapies are needed if we are to achieve the reductions in TB cases needed to meet the END TB targets.
Richard Chaisson

17:11 - 17:23: What's law got to do with it? New technologies for TB prevention and emerging human rights issuesThe role of law and human rights in the global tuberculosis (TB) response have been increasingly recognised as central to achieving global targets set in the End TB strategy and the United Nations Political Declaration on TB. Despite this, there is a lack of understanding and implementation of a human rights-based disease response. As new vaccine, diagnostic and treatment technologies emerge, including to prevent TB infection and/or disease and to diagnose and treat latent TB infection, the law and rights will play an even greater role in either supporting or hindering efforts to end the epidemic. Building on the other talks in this session, this presentation will consider the opportunities and risks associated with legal frameworks and human rights law to promote the availability and accessibility of new TB preventive technologies. The talk will focus on intellectual property and trade law and the rights to health and science.
Brian Citro

17:23 - 17:50: Q&A session

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SS-06-Discussion on COVID-19: is there a role for the 100-year-old BCG vaccine?
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SS-06-Discussion on COVID-19: is there a role for the 100-year-old BCG vaccine?
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This session has been made possible by an educational grant from AJVaccines

For almost a century, BCG vaccination has been widely used to protect against tuberculosis (TB). Non-specific effects, such as reducing overall infant mortality or the observation of fewer respiratory infections, have been attributed to the vaccine. Underlaying immune mechanisms have been proposed. Early on in the COVID-19 pandemic, epidemiological data suggested that populations with longstanding BCG vaccination may be less affected. Also, some homology between SARS-CoV-2 and Mycobacterium bovis, has been described. Several clinical trials in first responders and vulnerable populations are evaluating whether BCG mitigates the clinical course of COVID-19. Investigators will discuss the context and details of their trials.

18:15 - 18:20: Introduction by Camille Locht


18:20 - 18:40: COVID-19: is there a role for the 100-year-old BCG vaccine? Denmark For almost a century, BCG vaccination has been widely used to protect against tuberculosis (TB). Non-specific effects, such as  reducing overall infant mortality or the observation of fewer respiratory infections, have been attributed to the vaccine. Underlaying immune  mechanisms have been proposed. Several clinical trials in first responders and vulnerable populations are evaluating whether BCG mitigates the clinical course of COVID-19. Investigators will discuss the context and details of their trials.

Christine Benn

18:40 - 18:50: BCG vaccination to reduce the impact of COVID-19 in Australian healthcare workers following coronavirus exposure: BRACE trial Healthcare workers are at increased risk of contracting COVID-19, caused by SARS-CoV-2. Currently, there are no  vaccines or proven preventative interventions available to protect healthcare workers. The Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine is  designed to protect against tuberculosis (TB). However it also boosts immunity to protect against other infections. The purpose of the BRACE  trial is to find out whether BCG vaccination protects against COVID-19 or reduces severity of COVID-19 in healthcare workers.

Nigel Curtis

18:50 - 19:00: COVID-19: is there a role for the 100-year-old BCG vaccine? The South African study For almost a century, BCG vaccination has been widely used to protect against tuberculosis. Non-specific effects, such as  reducing overall infant mortality or the observation of fewer respiratory infections, have been attributed to the vaccine. Underlaying immune  mechanisms have been proposed.
Several clinical trials in first responders and vulnerable populations are evaluating whether BCG mitigates the clinical course of COVID-19.
Investigators will discuss the context and details of their trials.

Andreas Diacon

19:00 - 19:10: COVID-19: is there a role for the 100-year-old BCG vaccine? The Dutch study For almost a century, BCG vaccination has been widely used to protect against tuberculosis. Non-specific effects, such as  reducing overall infant mortality or the observation of fewer respiratory infections, have been attributed to the vaccine. Underlaying immune  mechanisms have been proposed.
Several clinical trials in first responders and vulnerable populations are evaluating whether BCG mitigates the clinical course of COVID-19.
Investigators will discuss the context and details of their trials.

Reinout van Crevel

19:10 - 19:20: COVID-19: is there a role for the 100-year-old BCG vaccine? Extension of the BRACE trial in Brazil For almost a century, BCG vaccination has been widely used to protect against tuberculosis. Non-specific effects, such as  reducing overall infant mortality or the observation of fewer respiratory infections, have been attributed to the vaccine. Underlaying immune  mechanisms have been proposed.
Several clinical trials in first responders and vulnerable populations are evaluating whether BCG mitigates the clinical course of COVID-19.
Investigators will discuss the context and details of their trials.

Julio Croda

19:20 - 19:45: Discussion Q&A session chaired by Camille Locht


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