19 October-1 December 2020
The 51st Union World Conference On Lung Health
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Channel 4
SP-08-Incarceration for drug use and TB among people who use drugs: time to break the cycle
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SP-08-Incarceration for drug use and TB among people who use drugs: time to break the cycle
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The interactive panel discussion in this session aims to highlight the impact of over incarceration on the United Nation's High-Level Meeting tuberculosis (TB) targets and the urgent need to reform drug policies as an effective approach in fighting COVID-19, TB and HIV.  It will bring together high-level policy makers, correctional medical doctors, civil society and drug policy makers to identify the influence of the criminalisation of drug use and possession on TB infection rates, to discuss the latest advances in drug policy and to explore how the response to TB can mobilise for drug policy reform.

15:00 - 15:05: Introduction

15:05 - 15:15: Incarceration, drug policies and TB in Tanzania and across Africa: reflections by the community of people who use drugsIn her presentation, Happy will reflect on the impact of incarceration and drug policies on tuberculosis (TB) in Tanzania and across Africa, particularly among women who use drugs. She will also share information about the situation with TB and multidrug-resistant TB, including among the key populations in Tanzania. She will share what concerns her most and what gives her hope for the way forward.
Happy Assan

15:15 - 15:25: The heavy toll of drug policies on TB: prison health and human rightsColleen Daniels will present an overview and discussion on how prisons are a highly ineffective way to deal with people who use drugs. With incarceration rates increasing every year, bad living conditions in prisons, exacerbated by poor access to healthcare, jeopardises the fight against communicable diseases, particularly tuberculosis (TB).  The presentation will discuss how mass incarceration, overcrowded prisons, and human rights violations contribute to fueling TB. These issues are compounded in countries that have high rates of incarceration for drug-related offences and in settings where there is no continuity of treatment for people entering and leaving the prison system. With a global prison population of 11 million people that keeps increasing every year, many prisons in the world are overcrowded due to the incarceration of people for drug-related offences, over 80% of them are in prisons for non violent offences.  In some countries, over 50% of the prison population are held under drug-related offences, while among female inmates this proportion is higher and up to 80% in some countries.  This presentation will outline the need to reform drug policy as an effective approach to fight TB and HIV.
Colleen Daniels

15:25 - 15:35: Reflections and suggestions for the way forward from people who use drugs in AsiaTuberculosis (TB) is one of the fastest growing epidemics among prison populations and one of the main causes of death, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. Yatie Jonet will share cross-Asia perspectives of people, who use drugs, on the influence of criminalisation on health, with a focus on TB. She will share powerful stories about experiences of people who use drugs with incarceration, getting infected in prison and lacking treatment in prison as well as positive stories on access to treatment in prison. She will share suggestions on the way forward from people who use drugs, focusing on the needs of women who use drugs. She will share what concerns her most and what gives her hope for the way forward.
Yatie Jonet

15:35 - 15:45: COVID-19, TB, harm reduction and prisons: challenges and opportunitiesLee will reflect on his personal journey of being the lawyer and the doctor. He will also share information about the situation with tuberculosis (TB) and multidrug-resistant TB, including among the key populations in the Philippines. Prisons and other closed settings are high risk environments for communicable diseases such as HIV, hepatitis C and TB as well as COVID-19. This presentations will draw on experiences in the Philippines. It will discuss that prisons, drug use and HIV are all independent risk factors for the development of TB and amplify each other into synergistic comorbid phenomena.  In the current context, COVID-19 also puts detained people and prison staff at extremely high risk, on top of these existing health threats. Yet the COVID-19 pandemic has also prompted countries to release people who were incarcerated for non-violent offences, including people who use drugs. This approach should urgently be adopted in other countries too and, critically, it opens up a debate about whether people who use drugs have rightly been detained in the first place.
Lee Yarcia

15:45 - 15:55: Vision, evidence and roadmap for the way forwardProfessor Michel Kazatchkine will discuss that punitive approaches to drug use and repressive drug policies have been hindering the results of the investments made in the fight against communicable diseases, particularly tuberculosis (TB). Health outcomes are exacerbated by overcrowding and unhealthy conditions, particularly in Eastern Europe and Central Asia. Michel will discuss how United Nations bodies and other regional human rights monitors could be better at monitoring and reporting on the issue of TB in prisons. Building on data related to incarceration around the world, this presentation will reflect that political will and partnerships - including with the medical, scientific communities, decision makers, parliamentarians and city mayors - are the main driver for drug policy reform and effective response to TB and co-infection. Mobilisation of the community working on addressing TB is key for scale-up of harm reduction services and drug policy reforms. It will discuss that further progressing drug policy reform across countries is key for the effective response to TB The presentation will discuss the impact of over incarceration on the achievement of the UN High-Level Meeting on TB targets, discuss solutions, suggest a way forward as well as reflecting on the presentations made.
Michel Kazatchkine

15:55 - 16:20: Q&A session

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E-posters
EP15-All hands on deck: key stakeholders take initiative to end TB
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EP15-All hands on deck: key stakeholders take initiative to end TB
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All E-posters are accessible via the "E-posters" section of the conference platform until 30 November.

EP15-239-22-Schoolchildren as TB ambassadors played crucial role in fighting TB epidemic by disseminating messages of symptoms and free treatment in five districts in OdishaSchoolchildren as tuberculosis (TB) ambassadors played a crucial role in fighting the TB epidemic by disseminating messages of symptoms and free treatment among their peers, family members and neighbourhood in five National TB Programme districts of Odisha. The low cost intervention/model proved beneficial to the target population in containing TB infection and disease control.
Gayadhar Mallick

EP15-240-22-Under fives TB case finding in hard-to-reach areas - a case for MalawiThis abstract narrates the importance of integration of childhood tuberculosis (TB) in the management of childhood illnesses in hard-to- reach areas in Malawi. Capacity building sessions by village clinic providers and provision of recording and reporting tools for daily use enhances the identification of children who are at risk of TB. 
Paul Chiwenkha

EP15-241-22-Caregivers’ beliefs in anti-TB medicines in the African/Indian SHINE trialWe explored beliefs in medicines among the carers of children on anti-tuberculosis (TB) treatment (ATT) in India, South Africa, Uganda and Zambia. This was a substudy of the SHINE trial. Caregivers reported positive belief in ATT and low negative beliefs about medicine in general.
Jessica Workman

EP15-242-22-Active TB case finding in refugee camps: a right for allThis abstract narrates the positive findings on an intervention that has been implemented by volunteers in refugees camps in Malawi. The intervention focused on capacity building and motivating volunteers in tuberculosis (TB) activities.  Good collaboration and co-ordination between volunteers and health workers has shown to find missed cases in vulnerable communities.
Beatrice Mtotha_Nindi

EP15-243-22-Community volunteers: what motivates them to be part of the TB world?Community-based volunteers play a very crucial role in tuberculosis (TB) activities. In 2017, Malawi National TB Control Progamme trained volunteers in awareness creation, advocacy, sputum collection, and transportation and TB screening. Different enablers were provided to the volunteers. We, therefore, analysed the drop-out rate of these volunteers, reasons for dropping out and their needs.
Henry Kanyerere

EP15-244-22-Role of community health workers in patient-centred care for TBIntensifying community-based tuberculosis (TB) services through community health workers showed better results in increased case notification, maintaining a high treatment success rate and DOTS expansion through a patient-centred approach. It also made it easier to introduce any potential interventions successfully.
Sardar Munim Ibna Mohsin

EP15-245-22-Addressing diagnosis delay in TB patients through engagement of Lady Health Workers in PakistanTuberculosis (TB) is one of the major public health problems in Pakistan. Due to a high incidence of upper respiratory infections with overlapping symptoms, particularly productive cough, delay in diagnosis of TB is quite common. Engagement of Lady Health Workers (LHWs) can lead to early diagnosis of TB in rural communities. 
Aamna Rashid

EP15-246-22-The road mapping of the community contribution in the battle to end TB in SenegalIn Senegal, the participation of community-based organisations in the fight against tuberculosis (TB) has shown that community engagement can be a sustainable solution to end TB, especially in low-setting countries.
Alpha Diallo

EP15-247-22-Engaging dairy co-operatives to support TB patients: a pilot from rural Bihar, IndiaActive community institutions like dairy co-operatives can be a vehicle to involve citizens in tuberculosis (TB) response. Beyond awareness, it can result in support to the patient, their families and to health workers.
Manish Bhardwaj

EP15-248-22-Stakeholder perceptions on the ethics, transparency and fairness of clustered trial randomisationWe conducted cluster randomisation for a tuberculosis (TB) diagnostic trial at a public randomisation ceremony attended by site staff and national TB programme representatives. The two-step randomisation process required active stakeholder participation and engagement. Survey responses suggest that public randomisation ceremonies may help to cultivate stakeholder engagement and increase trust in randomisation.
Talemwa Nalugwa

EP15-249-22-Tribal Action Plan Fund utilisation under NTP: how does Chhattisgarh state, in India, fare to improve programme performance?Tribal Action Plan Fund utilisation under National Tuberculosis Elimination Programme: how does Chhattisgarh state, in India, fare on spending to improve National Tuberculosis Elimination Programme (NTP) performance by its budgeted Tribal Action Fund for its beneficiaries?
Gayadhar Mallick

EP15-250-22-TB in the shadow of COVID-19: India's media coverage of TB during the COVID-19 pandemicThe media plays a crucial role in setting the public health agenda by raising public awareness and building discourses that make or break governments’ policy implementation. A brief evaluation of the media coverage of tuberculosis (TB) in 2020 was conducted to document the discourse around TB before, and during, the COVID-19 pandemic.
Almas Shamim

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Channel 5
SP-21-Engaging communities to address concurrent pandemics of TB and COVID-19
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SP-21-Engaging communities to address concurrent pandemics of TB and COVID-19
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This symposium will utilise a range of perspectives to explore the critical role of community engagement to address tuberculosis (TB) and COVID-19. We will hear front line field notes from a community health worker (CHW) in South Africa. We will learn from experiences of applying knowledge from TB to deliver testing and contact tracing for COVID-19 through non-profit organisations in Peru and the U.S. We will examine strategies for engaging with policy makers to support CHWs and reduce the dual stigma of these infections. Finally, we will discuss partnerships with the media to maximise the impact of public health messaging to communities.

15:00 - 15:05: Introduction

15:05 - 15:15: Field notes: a frontline community health worker perspective on responding to TB in the time of COVID-19Community health workers (CHWs) play a critical role in supporting person-centred care, raising tuberculosis (TB) awareness, providing TB information in local languages to communities, and reaching missing people with TB who are not accessing health services and linking them to the health system. Each person has a human right to health and CHWs play a critical role in transforming the TB response to be equitable, rights-based and people-centred. Yet, CHWs are not provided with platforms to inform the TB response despite being experts on the healthcare needs of communities. Ms. Muedi will discuss insights from frontline CHWs, including identified gaps in the training and personal protective equipment offered to CHWs caring for people with TB, and the role of CHWs in the response to COVID-19.  
Portia Muedi

15:15 - 15:25: Prioritising partnerships: mobilising community health workers to fight COVID-19 in PeruSocios En Salud (SES) has partnered with the United States Agency for International Development to support Peru’s healthcare system to care for patients with COVID-19. Dr. Lecca will discuss how SES activated a community health worker network to safely conduct outreach visits to identify families needing clinical and social support in Peru’s hardest hit regions of Lima as well as a medical call centre to conduct telehealth consultations. Dr. Lecca will discuss how SES applied its many years of experience mobilising CHWs to contact public health education and contact tracing for TB in order to train CHWs to safely provide community-based care and education.  
Leonid Lecca

15:25 - 15:35: Bending the curve: leveraging experiences from TB care to contain COVID-19 in MassachusettsPartners In Health (PIH) is a non-governmental organisation that has built long standing relationships with ministries of health and communities in the world’s poorest settings, with the goal of providing the highest standard of care to all. As such, they are well positioned to tackle COVID-19, which is having a disproportionate impact on communities already affected by poverty and poor healthcare. Dr. Seung will discuss how PIH developed an ambitious response that sought to bend, rather than merely flatten, the curve of COVID-19 in Massachusetts and other U.S. states by applying lessons learned from TB with respect to testing, contact tracing, and supported quarantine and isolation. He will discuss the challenges of implementing rapid testing and addressing the social and economic needs of underserved communities, including the use of food and cash assistance, as part of a comprehensive response.
KJ Seung

15:35 - 15:45: Engaging policy makers to protect community health workersMs. Schoeman will discuss insights gained from leading a Gates Foundation funded project to empower community health workers (CHWs) to motivate for and contribute to person-centred tuberculosis (TB) care, by providing training in advocacy, media and communications. In response to stigma being identified as a major barrier in the TB care cascade, she helped to facilitate CHWs in Hammanskraal, Gauteng province, to develop community-focused theatre plays to address stigma.  She will discuss the challenges of building and maintaining strong relationships locally, provincially and nationally in order to secure support for in-service TB training of CHWs and for an implementation plan to accompany the Ward Based Primary Health Care Outreach Team policy that was recently released by the department of health. Finally, she will examine how TB Proof was able to leverage its TB advocacy partnerships to advocate to the South African government to impose a lockdown and #Masks4All policy to disrupt COVID-19 transmission.

Ingrid Schoeman

15:45 - 15:55: Partnering with the media to deliver public health messages to communitiesGovernments in high tuberculosis (TB) incidence settings like India have consistently failed to invest adequately in health and ensure funding of basic programmes to test, trace and treat TB. Concurrently, stigma and mistrust of government health systems have fuelled longstanding challenges to engage communities to participate in TB screening and to complete treatment. The COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated social inequities with lockdowns and mass unemployment that have a disproportionate effect on the poorest, particularly while investment in testing, tracing and isolation remains inadequate. Ms. Krishnan will discuss insights she has gained from interviews with people affected by TB and other key stakeholders in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. She will provide suggestions as to how public health professionals can engage communities with more effective messaging and interventions that are responsive to their needs. She will also address perceived gaps in current TB advocacy, from her unique perspective as a journalist.
Vidya Krishnan

15:55 - 16:20: Q&A session

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Channel 1
OA-21-Finding missing people with TB: targeted approaches
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OA-21-Finding missing people with TB: targeted approaches
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16:30 - 16:35: Introduction


16:35 - 16:43: OA-21-626-22-TB screening and treatment by neo-literate community volunteers among tribal populations in insurgency hit Swabhiman Anchal saved lives and livelihoods in Malkangiri district, Odisha Tuberculosis (TB) screening and treatment by neo/semi-literate community volunteers among tribal populations in insurgency hit Swabhiman Anchal (cut-off area) saved lives and livelihoods in Malkangiri district, Odisha. Engaging the community themselves and adapting out-of-box strategies brought a significant impact on the disease prevalence and mortality among such a community.

Gayadhar Mallick

16:43 - 16:51: OA-21-627-22-Investigating the feasibility of universal screenings and instituional treatment support of the homeless population through a mobile digital X-ray and CBNAAT algorithm in India A pilot study demonstrated the efficacy of a universal screening test, using a mobile digital X-ray and CBNAAT algorithm, and the high, untreated burden of tuberculosis (TB) among the homeless population in Delhi.  It also pointed to the importance of a diversity of treatment support mechanisms required for treatment completion.

Armaan Mullick Alkazi

16:51 - 16:59: OA-21-628-22-Risk factors associated with loss to follow-up among multidrug-resistant TB patients in Ukraine Risk factors associated with loss to follow-up (LTFU) among multidrug-resistant (MDR-TB) patients in Ukraine. Our data reinforced the concept that LTFU in MDR-TB is a serious public health problem and that adequate follow-up of treatment is necessary, along with the expansion of social support programmes for patients, in order to avoid unfavourable outcomes.

Olha Zaitseva

16:59 - 17:07: OA-21-629-22-Promoting a community-led, multisectoral and collaborative response to TB: learnings from India Globally, the tuberculosis (TB) response has remained largely biomedical, with minimal involvement of communities and other actors. An intervention to engage previously un-engaged stakeholders and to broaden the conversation around TB was implemented in India between 2016-2019 and affirmed that a multisectoral, community-led approach is essential to trigger collective action.

Anupama Srinivasan

17:07 - 17:15: OA-21-630-22-Towards a Nairobi TB free city: engaging city authorities towards the elimination of TB: the case of the Nairobi City County government Local city authorities play a critical role towards attainment of the End TB Strategy goals. However, their engagement has been challenging in many countries. This presentation outlines key steps towards successful engagement of city authorities in tuberculosis (TB) activities to ensure ownership and sustainability of efforts towards ending TB.

Ann Masese

17:15 - 17:23: OA-21-631-22-Maintaining TB care and management through community refills in a high HIV-TB-burden setting in the era of COVID-19 TB-HIV care was provided in the community due to COVID-19 measures, which limited the ability of patients to come to the clinic for routine care and drug refills. The community programme implementation alleviated travel challenges and led clinicians to also understand community influences in accessing to care.

Hloniphile Gama

17:23 - 17:31: OA-21-632-22-A WhatsApp-based interactive communication strategy to reduce initial loss to follow-up among presumptive TB patients in a high-incidence setting Delays and losses along the tuberculosis (TB) care cascade constitute important challenges for TB programmes. Mobile messaging services, such as WhatsApp, might help mitigate these challenges. We developed and piloted a WhatsApp-based interactive communication intervention to reduce initial loss to follow-up among individuals awaiting TB test results in a high-incidence setting.



Florian M. Marx

17:31 - 17:50: Q&A


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SP-34-Human rights and tobacco: progress and next steps for protecting populations from tobacco industry interference in child health
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SP-34-Human rights and tobacco: progress and next steps for protecting populations from tobacco industry interference in child health
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This session will focus on how stakeholders in health and human rights can use a human rights based approach to protect children’s rights and accelerate the implementation of tobacco control measures at national level. We will provide practical examples of how to use human rights mechanisms and human rights treaties as well as coordinated campaigns around national reporting obligations to human rights treaties.
 

15:00 - 15:05: Introduction

15:05 - 15:17: Human rights-based approach as the pathway for protecting populations from tobacco industry: global progress and next stepsA human rights approach to ending the tobacco epidemic is unique. It frames the freedom from smoking addiction, and the health harms from tobacco use, as a human right and requires governments to advance human development by implementing measures that decrease use. The Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) has brought significant progress in advancing health, but lacks enforcement mechanisms. Using human rights obligations forces the hands of governments, empowers tobacco control advocates, brings new allies and suggests innovative policy solutions. This presentation will discuss both top-down and bottom-up approaches and illustrates the progress that is being made by advocates around the world. Bottom-up approach involves human rights mechanisms to advance tobacco control by engaging in the reporting processes associated with national human rights treaty obligations. The global top-down approach integrates tobacco control objectives among global human rights bodies as well as collaboration among health and human rights mechanisms.
Laurent Huber

15:17 - 15:29: Human rights reporting and campaigning on tobacco use and imported tobacco in GermanyGermany has not implemented key tobacco control policies and politicians often portray tobacco as an individual lifestyle choice rather than an issue that needs government regulation. By framing tobacco control as a human rights and children‘s rights issue and by using human rights reporting mechanisms, civil society puts pressure on the German government to implement regulatory measures. In 2018, Unfairtobacco started to build the German Network for Children‘s Rights and Tobacco Control, bringing actors from different backgrounds together that had no links to each other before: organisations in public health, human/children‘s rights and development. Because human rights treaties have enforcement mechanisms that are lacking in the FCTC, this angle advances tobacco control advocacy in Germany. With this presentation, we aim to share our experience and, thereby, build the capacity of colleagues on how to use human rights arguments and reporting processes to advance tobacco control in their countries.

Laura Graen

15:29 - 15:41: Reclaiming child rights to health by preventing the tobacco industry from using disruptive tactics to deny rights to be tobacco-freeThe denial of children’s rights is at the heart of the tobacco industry’s interference in health policies. Five of the largest tobacco companies control 80% of the global market, and mergers and acquisitions have solidified interference on an industrial scale. Driven by shareholder demand for profits, the industry needs children to replace the sick, the dying and those that have quit. With no apparent intention of ending their marketing of addictive, lethal products, which kill 8 million people a year, the industry is aggressively releasing new products and using front groups, corporate social responsibility and philanthropy to disrupt tobacco control. While the interference tactics of Big Tobacco are well documented, their misleading concerns about children (while simultaneously denying their rights) demands a more strategic response, with integrated use of treaties and frameworks to protect children.
Anne Jones

15:41 - 15:53: Child labour in tobacco: a violation of human rights and national law in BangladeshThe exploitation of children as labour in tobacco manufacturing is a major problem as both a violation of human rights and the national law in Bangladesh. Avenues to counter child labour exist and will be reviewed along with challenges and opportunities to do more to protect children from tobacco and tobacco industry interference. 
Syed Mahbubul Alam

15:53 - 16:20: Q&A session

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E-posters
EP33-Barriers in the TB care cascade: it's time for local solutions
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EP33-Barriers in the TB care cascade: it's time for local solutions
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All E-posters are accessible via the "E-posters" section of the conference platform until 30 November.

EP33-414-24-Barriers to care-seeking for TB in the Philippines: a qualitative study through the lens of behavioural scienceThrough the lens of behavioural science, qualitative research was conducted on care-seeking in communities with high prevalence of tuberculosis (TB) in the Philippines. Through interviews with people affected by TB, community members and health providers, the study investigated behavioural barriers to care-seeking faced by individuals experiencing symptoms suggestive of TB.
Emily Zimmerman

EP33-415-24-Does exposure to TB meetings, either small or large groups, improve the knowledge and health-seeking behaviour for early TB diagnosis? Experience from Bengaluru and HyderabadCommunity health workers conducted small, and large, group communication activities under Tuberculosis Health Action Learning Initiative (THALI), funded by the United States Agency for International Development, in two metro cities. Evaluation of the effect of these activities to improve the knowledge and health-seeking behaviours for tuberculosis.   
RAJARAM Potty

EP33-416-24-Community engagement activities reduce patient delays in TB diagnosis and treatment initiation in Bengaluru and Hyderabad cities, South IndiaWe conducted community engagement activities through trained community health workers in two metro cities in Southern India. The study highlighted the effect of these activities in improving the early diagnosis and treatment among tuberculosis patients accessing public health services.  
RAJARAM Potty

EP33-417-24-Provision of peer support by TB survivors to people with TB through the TB programme in India: successes, challenges and the way forwardIn-depth interviews were done to understand successes and challenges in provision of peer support by trained tuberculosis (TB) champions through the United States Agency for International Development's Call to Action project. Though the programme expressed need for more TB champions, there were varied levels of support to implementation. Orientation of programme staff would be required for institutionalisation of peer support.
Raghini Ranganathan

EP33-418-24-Addressing stigma in people living with drug-resistant TB in India: photovoice studyThis intervention explores the provision of Photovoice to understand multidrug-resistant TB-related stigma. Embedded within participatory action research, nine female patients at an Médecins Sans Frontières project in Mumbai, used Photovoice to understand their lived experiences of stigma and gauge the efficacy of it as a tool for alleviating stigmatic pain.
Tahiya Mahbub

EP33-419-24-Perceptions about TB and perceived TB-related stigma and associated factors among the mining community in EswatiniPerceptions about tuberculosis (TB) and factors associated with perceived TB-related stigma among the mining community in Eswatini, were assessed using a cross-sectional, descriptive, quantitative study design. The mining community perceives TB as very serious and expressed stigmatising thoughts, associated with age, period of stay in an area and certain geographical areas.
Charles Maibvise

EP33-420-24-Cost related to diagnosis and care endured by multidrug-resistant TB patients in a reference hospital in Cameroon: a transversal exploration.A preliminary part of a more complete study evaluates the costs that multidrug-resistant tuberculosis patients and their families, in a low-middle income country in Central Africa, endure when diagnosed and treated with a standardised, short course treatment regimen. More than 75% of the patients had catastrophic costs.  
Rikiatou Fandie

EP33-421-24-Coverage of health insurance schemes among Myanmar migrants with TB in a border area of Thailand and its associated factors: an interim analysisMigrants are vulnerable and important for tuberculosis (TB) control. Less than half of migrants with TB had health insurance (the focus was on documented migrants who are secured in working and living life). Strengthening health insurance among migrants is important to improve access to health services.
Myo Minn Oo

EP33-422-24-Social support for TB patients living in extreme poverty: experience from BangladeshSocial support overcomes the economic, geographical, sociocultural and health system barriers for tuberculosis (TB) patients, especially those who are living below the poverty line. Financial support for ultra-poor patients saves them from the catastrophic healthcare cost, which also ensures treatment adherence and a better outcome.
Sardar Munim Ibna Mohsin

EP33-423-24-Gender-wise differentials in coverage of social protection schemeGender differentials exist in the coverage of nutritional support incentives in the community. Understanding the social and cultural factors responsible for the differences would be crucial in ensuring gender-responsive services to all tuberculosis patients.
Deepak Balasubramanian

EP33-424-24-A nationwide survey of cross-border referral assistance (or lack thereof) for TB patients in JapanAdequate and effective referral for tuberculosis (TB) patients crossing national borders is critical in ensuring continuity of care, yet remains overlooked. We conducted a cross-sectional, nationwide survey to explore the situation of foreign-born TB patients, who are leaving Japan while still on treatment, and highlighted some issues.
Lisa Kawatsu

EP33-425-24-Barriers to TB preventive therapy initiation in people living with HIV in Cambodia: patients and clinicians perspectiveWe assessed barriers to tuberculosis preventive therapy (TPT) from people living with HIV and healthcare workers, in Cambodia, through focus group discussions. Side effects, adherence challenges and treatment duration with six months isoniazid, were the main barriers. Training, counselling and better tolerated, shorter regimens may improve TPT coverage.
Marion MORA

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SP-48-Understanding the impact of participatory approaches in developing sustainable TB policies
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SP-48-Understanding the impact of participatory approaches in developing sustainable TB policies
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While there is increasing awareness of the importance of engaging civil society, many countries and regions are not yet truly implementing it. Using examples from work in the World Health Organization Europe Region, this session will demonstrate the impact that participatory approaches (that involve community groups, key populations and patients) have had.  The TB Europe Coalition has been working for a number of years, joining civil society and policy makers, to build sustainable TB policy through national dialogues. This symposium aims to encourage countries to build participatory approaches into their policy planning and inform civil society about best practice in this regard.

15:00 - 15:05: Introduction

15:05 - 15:15: The role of national dialogues in ensuring policy sustainability: best practices and lessons learnedUsing the TB Europe Coalition’s extensive experience facilitating national dialogues for participation in policy making, Mariya Makovetska will present the best practices that have been developed in this area to bridge the gap between civil society organisations and the health services to provide people-centred tuberculosis services and lessons learned, for other organisations and regions to use and adapt.
Mariya Makovetska

15:15 - 15:25: Barriers to participatory approaches to policy makingWhile there is increasing recognition of the importance of participatory approaches, this is by no means universal. In this presentation, Paul Sommerfeld will highlight some of the main barriers that TBEC has faced in its work in this regard over the past decade. He will also explore some of the paths he has taken to overcome obstacles and ensure the successful inclusion of civil society groups in policy change. This provides an opportunity for other groups to learn and develop their own strategies.
Paul Sommerfeld

15:25 - 15:35: Civil society on the road to a TB lawIn November 2018, Romania adopted a law for tuberculosis (TB) prevention and control. This includes sick leave entitlement throughout treatment and ambulatory nutritional support. The process of ensuring the law’s adoption was a long process, taking years of consolidated work from civil society. In this presentation, Cristina will explore the ways that civil society groups and individuals worked to ensure the law’s adoption over this period, providing lessons for other countries, as well as demonstrating the vital role of individual and organisational participation in policy development.
Cristina Enache

15:35 - 15:45: Participatory approaches in action: collaboration between the World Health Organization and civil society to end TBThe panel presentation will reflect on the collaboration between the Word Health Organization (WHO) and civil society within the aspects of the participatory approaches, including WHO ENGAGE-TB framework.  This can be seen in the establishment of the WHO Civil Society Task Force on TB and the RCC-THV. Throughout the last few years, the participation of civil society and TB-affected communities in NTP reviews has been facilitated through the support of the WHO Regional Office for Europe. This engagement allowed for grassroots perspectives as to the success and barriers in TB programmes to be voiced, as well as providing recommendations for the format of quality people-centred care based on the personal experience of former patients.
The presentation will raise awareness of the interested stakeholders on the opportunities for participatory approaches to end TB as well as further areas of strengthening intersectorial collaboration.
Yuliya Chorna

15:45 - 15:55: Civil society participation in policy development in AzerbaijanParticipatory initiatives in Azerbaijan, including national dialogues, have been very successful in building the political will to end tuberculosis (TB). After the national dialogue, the government announced a call for proposals on two TB grants and the national strategic plan was developed with the participation of NGOs. In this presentation, Elchin Mukhtarli will explain the impact of national dialogues in developing and improving policy regarding TB. Through this work, intersectorial partnerships (between CSO and parliamentarians, CSO and NTP etc.) have been established, a patients’ community network was created and many more activities have been successfully conducted. Of particular importance has been NGO involvement in the continuation of treatment for people with TB after release from prison. Initially, treatment continuation rates were at approximately 10%. However, following CSO involvement in care in 2011, these have risen to 97%.
Parvana Valiyeva

15:55 - 16:20: Q&A session

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