19 October-1 December 2020
The 51st Union World Conference On Lung Health
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Channel 4
SP-08-Incarceration for drug use and TB among people who use drugs: time to break the cycle
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SP-08-Incarceration for drug use and TB among people who use drugs: time to break the cycle
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The interactive panel discussion in this session aims to highlight the impact of over incarceration on the United Nation's High-Level Meeting tuberculosis (TB) targets and the urgent need to reform drug policies as an effective approach in fighting COVID-19, TB and HIV.  It will bring together high-level policy makers, correctional medical doctors, civil society and drug policy makers to identify the influence of the criminalisation of drug use and possession on TB infection rates, to discuss the latest advances in drug policy and to explore how the response to TB can mobilise for drug policy reform.

15:00 - 15:05: Introduction

15:05 - 15:15: Incarceration, drug policies and TB in Tanzania and across Africa: reflections by the community of people who use drugsIn her presentation, Happy will reflect on the impact of incarceration and drug policies on tuberculosis (TB) in Tanzania and across Africa, particularly among women who use drugs. She will also share information about the situation with TB and multidrug-resistant TB, including among the key populations in Tanzania. She will share what concerns her most and what gives her hope for the way forward.
Happy Assan

15:15 - 15:25: The heavy toll of drug policies on TB: prison health and human rightsColleen Daniels will present an overview and discussion on how prisons are a highly ineffective way to deal with people who use drugs. With incarceration rates increasing every year, bad living conditions in prisons, exacerbated by poor access to healthcare, jeopardises the fight against communicable diseases, particularly tuberculosis (TB).  The presentation will discuss how mass incarceration, overcrowded prisons, and human rights violations contribute to fueling TB. These issues are compounded in countries that have high rates of incarceration for drug-related offences and in settings where there is no continuity of treatment for people entering and leaving the prison system. With a global prison population of 11 million people that keeps increasing every year, many prisons in the world are overcrowded due to the incarceration of people for drug-related offences, over 80% of them are in prisons for non violent offences.  In some countries, over 50% of the prison population are held under drug-related offences, while among female inmates this proportion is higher and up to 80% in some countries.  This presentation will outline the need to reform drug policy as an effective approach to fight TB and HIV.
Colleen Daniels

15:25 - 15:35: Reflections and suggestions for the way forward from people who use drugs in AsiaTuberculosis (TB) is one of the fastest growing epidemics among prison populations and one of the main causes of death, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. Yatie Jonet will share cross-Asia perspectives of people, who use drugs, on the influence of criminalisation on health, with a focus on TB. She will share powerful stories about experiences of people who use drugs with incarceration, getting infected in prison and lacking treatment in prison as well as positive stories on access to treatment in prison. She will share suggestions on the way forward from people who use drugs, focusing on the needs of women who use drugs. She will share what concerns her most and what gives her hope for the way forward.
Yatie Jonet

15:35 - 15:45: COVID-19, TB, harm reduction and prisons: challenges and opportunitiesLee will reflect on his personal journey of being the lawyer and the doctor. He will also share information about the situation with tuberculosis (TB) and multidrug-resistant TB, including among the key populations in the Philippines. Prisons and other closed settings are high risk environments for communicable diseases such as HIV, hepatitis C and TB as well as COVID-19. This presentations will draw on experiences in the Philippines. It will discuss that prisons, drug use and HIV are all independent risk factors for the development of TB and amplify each other into synergistic comorbid phenomena.  In the current context, COVID-19 also puts detained people and prison staff at extremely high risk, on top of these existing health threats. Yet the COVID-19 pandemic has also prompted countries to release people who were incarcerated for non-violent offences, including people who use drugs. This approach should urgently be adopted in other countries too and, critically, it opens up a debate about whether people who use drugs have rightly been detained in the first place.
Lee Yarcia

15:45 - 15:55: Vision, evidence and roadmap for the way forwardProfessor Michel Kazatchkine will discuss that punitive approaches to drug use and repressive drug policies have been hindering the results of the investments made in the fight against communicable diseases, particularly tuberculosis (TB). Health outcomes are exacerbated by overcrowding and unhealthy conditions, particularly in Eastern Europe and Central Asia. Michel will discuss how United Nations bodies and other regional human rights monitors could be better at monitoring and reporting on the issue of TB in prisons. Building on data related to incarceration around the world, this presentation will reflect that political will and partnerships - including with the medical, scientific communities, decision makers, parliamentarians and city mayors - are the main driver for drug policy reform and effective response to TB and co-infection. Mobilisation of the community working on addressing TB is key for scale-up of harm reduction services and drug policy reforms. It will discuss that further progressing drug policy reform across countries is key for the effective response to TB The presentation will discuss the impact of over incarceration on the achievement of the UN High-Level Meeting on TB targets, discuss solutions, suggest a way forward as well as reflecting on the presentations made.
Michel Kazatchkine

15:55 - 16:20: Q&A session

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E-posters
EP15-All hands on deck: key stakeholders take initiative to end TB
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EP15-All hands on deck: key stakeholders take initiative to end TB
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All E-posters are accessible via the "E-posters" section of the conference platform until 30 November.

EP15-239-22-Schoolchildren as TB ambassadors played crucial role in fighting TB epidemic by disseminating messages of symptoms and free treatment in five districts in OdishaSchoolchildren as tuberculosis (TB) ambassadors played a crucial role in fighting the TB epidemic by disseminating messages of symptoms and free treatment among their peers, family members and neighbourhood in five National TB Programme districts of Odisha. The low cost intervention/model proved beneficial to the target population in containing TB infection and disease control.
Gayadhar Mallick

EP15-240-22-Under fives TB case finding in hard-to-reach areas - a case for MalawiThis abstract narrates the importance of integration of childhood tuberculosis (TB) in the management of childhood illnesses in hard-to- reach areas in Malawi. Capacity building sessions by village clinic providers and provision of recording and reporting tools for daily use enhances the identification of children who are at risk of TB. 
Paul Chiwenkha

EP15-241-22-Caregivers’ beliefs in anti-TB medicines in the African/Indian SHINE trialWe explored beliefs in medicines among the carers of children on anti-tuberculosis (TB) treatment (ATT) in India, South Africa, Uganda and Zambia. This was a substudy of the SHINE trial. Caregivers reported positive belief in ATT and low negative beliefs about medicine in general.
Jessica Workman

EP15-242-22-Active TB case finding in refugee camps: a right for allThis abstract narrates the positive findings on an intervention that has been implemented by volunteers in refugees camps in Malawi. The intervention focused on capacity building and motivating volunteers in tuberculosis (TB) activities.  Good collaboration and co-ordination between volunteers and health workers has shown to find missed cases in vulnerable communities.
Beatrice Mtotha_Nindi

EP15-243-22-Community volunteers: what motivates them to be part of the TB world?Community-based volunteers play a very crucial role in tuberculosis (TB) activities. In 2017, Malawi National TB Control Progamme trained volunteers in awareness creation, advocacy, sputum collection, and transportation and TB screening. Different enablers were provided to the volunteers. We, therefore, analysed the drop-out rate of these volunteers, reasons for dropping out and their needs.
Henry Kanyerere

EP15-244-22-Role of community health workers in patient-centred care for TBIntensifying community-based tuberculosis (TB) services through community health workers showed better results in increased case notification, maintaining a high treatment success rate and DOTS expansion through a patient-centred approach. It also made it easier to introduce any potential interventions successfully.
Sardar Munim Ibna Mohsin

EP15-245-22-Addressing diagnosis delay in TB patients through engagement of Lady Health Workers in PakistanTuberculosis (TB) is one of the major public health problems in Pakistan. Due to a high incidence of upper respiratory infections with overlapping symptoms, particularly productive cough, delay in diagnosis of TB is quite common. Engagement of Lady Health Workers (LHWs) can lead to early diagnosis of TB in rural communities. 
Aamna Rashid

EP15-246-22-The road mapping of the community contribution in the battle to end TB in SenegalIn Senegal, the participation of community-based organisations in the fight against tuberculosis (TB) has shown that community engagement can be a sustainable solution to end TB, especially in low-setting countries.
Alpha Diallo

EP15-247-22-Engaging dairy co-operatives to support TB patients: a pilot from rural Bihar, IndiaActive community institutions like dairy co-operatives can be a vehicle to involve citizens in tuberculosis (TB) response. Beyond awareness, it can result in support to the patient, their families and to health workers.
Manish Bhardwaj

EP15-248-22-Stakeholder perceptions on the ethics, transparency and fairness of clustered trial randomisationWe conducted cluster randomisation for a tuberculosis (TB) diagnostic trial at a public randomisation ceremony attended by site staff and national TB programme representatives. The two-step randomisation process required active stakeholder participation and engagement. Survey responses suggest that public randomisation ceremonies may help to cultivate stakeholder engagement and increase trust in randomisation.
Talemwa Nalugwa

EP15-249-22-Tribal Action Plan Fund utilisation under NTP: how does Chhattisgarh state, in India, fare to improve programme performance?Tribal Action Plan Fund utilisation under National Tuberculosis Elimination Programme: how does Chhattisgarh state, in India, fare on spending to improve National Tuberculosis Elimination Programme (NTP) performance by its budgeted Tribal Action Fund for its beneficiaries?
Gayadhar Mallick

EP15-250-22-TB in the shadow of COVID-19: India's media coverage of TB during the COVID-19 pandemicThe media plays a crucial role in setting the public health agenda by raising public awareness and building discourses that make or break governments’ policy implementation. A brief evaluation of the media coverage of tuberculosis (TB) in 2020 was conducted to document the discourse around TB before, and during, the COVID-19 pandemic.
Almas Shamim

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Channel 1
OA-12-Confronting TB stigma
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OA-12-Confronting TB stigma
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12:30 - 12:35: Introduction


12:35 - 12:43: OA-12-569-22-Why is TB called the ‘disease of paper’? Exploring perceptions about the spread of TB in rural South Africa Understanding community perceptions of tuberculosis (TB) spread is valuable to informing clear communication during health visits. People diagnosed with TB can be subjected to ineffective and stigmatising TB infection control practices at home. Health workers need to proactively provide information to families and people diagnosed with TB in order to prevent discrimination.

Helene-Mari Van der Westhuizen

12:43 - 12:51: OA-12-570-22-Characterising TB stigma in the community: a mixed methods study in Cambodia While biomedical approaches, such as case detection and treatment, have contributed substantially to the country's fight against tuberculosis (TB), other social determinants of health, such as stigma, are not well understood in Cambodia. This study aimed to characterise and explore the determinants of TB stigma among people with TB in Cambodia.  

Sovannary Tuot

12:51 - 12:59: OA-12-571-22-TB-related stigma in urban communities in Uganda: what are the predictors? In Ugandan urban communities, tuberculosis (TB) related stigma was higher among TB patients (65.6%) compared to non-TB patients (49.8%). The risk factors included having HIV-related stigma, being below 50 years of age and being a TB patient or a TB patient with low TB knowledge. Stigma reduction interventions should target these for greater impact.

Timothy Kiyemba

12:59 - 13:07: OA-12-572-22-Gender differences in perceived TB stigma in Kampala, Uganda: a cross- sectional analysis Tuberculosis (TB) is stigmatised in many high burden settings. Perceived stigma prevents individuals from engaging with TB diagnostic and treatment services. Men and women may differ in perceptions of, or sensitivity to, TB-related stigma. We conducted a cross-sectional study of perceived TB-related stigma to compare perceptions of TB stigma by gender.

Amanda J Meyer

13:07 - 13:15: OA-12-573-22-A mixed methods assessment of stigma in people living with drug-resistant TB and HIV in South Africa We characterise drug-resistant TB (DR-TB)/HIV stigma among co-infected patients in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, as part of the PRAXIS (Prospective Study of Adherence in M/XDR-TB Implementation Science) study. The drivers and manifestation of internal and enacted stigma attributable to DR-TB and HIV are elucidated, compared and linked, using mixed methods.

Amrita Daftary

13:15 - 13:23: OA-12-574-22-“I hope we can do infection control in a more human way.” Balancing safety and stigma in rural South African health facilities Tuberculosis infection prevention and control (IPC) measures, such as masks and patient separation, may be stigmatising to patients. It is also critical for preventing the spread of TB in health facilities. Developing messaging that clearly explains TB IPC, and which emphasises communal wellbeing and safety, could assist with addressing TB stigma.

Helene-Mari Van der Westhuizen

13:23 - 13:31: OA-12-575-22-Funding human rights programmes in the TB response: the Global Fund experience Stigma and discrimination are most frequently identified human rights barriers to accessing tuberculosis (TB) services. However, there is little understanding of programmes in order to address such barriers and how to integrate those programmes in TB response. The Global Fund is committed to supporting programmes to address access barriers and there will be discussion on the lessons learned.

Hyeyoung Lim

13:31 - 13:39: OA-12-576-22-The development and validation of a scale to measure stigma around, and in people with, drug-resistant TB This is a cross-sectional study, conducted in Viet Nam, which evaluated 45 stigma-related items in order to develop the first multidrug-resistant tuberculosis stigma scale. Exploratory factor analysis was used for item reduction and psychometric analysis was conducted to assess the validity of the remaining 14-item scale. 

Lisa Redwood

13:39 - 13:50: Q&A


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SP-31-Challenges and issues in ensuring continuum of care for migrants crossing borders with TB.
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SP-31-Challenges and issues in ensuring continuum of care for migrants crossing borders with TB.
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While it has been recognised that migrants are one of the key populations who are at greater risk of TB infection and disease, less attention has been paid to the risk of interrupting treatment among those who cross borders while still on TB treatment and the need to ensure continuum of care from one country to another. This symposium will introduce programmes from the US and Japan, as well as Southern African countries, that look to ensure migrants continue and complete their treatment after travelling to another country. It will look at the perspectives of both sending and receiving countries and discuss challenges and issues.

12:30 - 12:35: Introduction

12:35 - 12:47: CureTB-Transnational Continuity of CareIn the US, 2-4% of people diagnosed with active tuberculosis (TB), transfer out prior to treatment completion. The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Division of Global Migration and Quarantine provides linkage to destination countries and follow-up for TB patients that transfer out through the CureTB programme. This presentation will describe the work of CureTB, referral and outcome data, as well as elements that enhance success for mobile patients.
Kathleen Moser

12:47 - 12:59: Bridge TB Care: the first step in bridging care and support for foreign-born persons with TB who are returning to countries of originWhile in Japan, approximately 1 in 10 of its foreign-born tuberculosis (TB) patients are transferred out of the country prior to completing their treatment, there had been no coordinated support provided to such patients, to ensure continuum of care. Following a national survey on the state of 'transfer-out' of foreign-born TB patients, in May 2020, a project – Bridge TB Care - was launched by the Research Institute of Tuberculosis, to coordinate smooth transfer of TB treatment from Japan to countries patients are travelling to, and follow-up until the completion of TB treatment. This presentation will discuss the main findings of the national survey and present some of the early experiences of the Bridge TB Care.
Lisa Kawatsu

12:59 - 13:11: Building regional consensus on minimum standards for continuum of TB care in SADC regionCross-border migration is a challenge to tuberculosis (TB) control in Southern Africa Development Community (SADC), with an estimated five million documented and 20 million undocumented, migrants and 500,000 mine workers with high burden of TB, frequently migrating across countries. SADC member states endorsed political declarations and frameworks to harmonise TB management seven years ago, but there was insufficient implementation. A recent assessment revealed that patients crossed borders without formal referrals, minimal to no documentation, no feedbacks or re-initiation of multidrug-resistant TB treatment with country-specific regimens. The SATBHSS project facilitated consensus and development of regional standards for TB continuum of care among eight SADC countries including intercountry communication and monitoring and evaluation; cross-border referrals of drug-susceptible and drug-resistant TB; continuum of treatment with same regimens; integration of TB in existing cross-border surveillance platforms; and integration of  paper and electronic cross-border referral systems. This presentation will describe the process of development, the standards, training and pilot.
Ivandra Chirrime

13:11 - 13:47: Q&A session

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SP-35-Migration journeys and the risk for TB – what do we know and what do we need to find out?
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SP-35-Migration journeys and the risk for TB – what do we know and what do we need to find out?
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Migration is an important determinant for tuberculosis (TB) epidemiology, both in low and high TB incidence
countries. It can change exposure risk and host vulnerabilities. Especially dangerous transit routes that include crowded and unsafe transport and stopovers may increase the risk for TB
infection and development of disease. This, however, remains largely underexplored. This symposium aims to review migration routes and their health impacts - including TB - outline comparative TB epidemiology and review policy implications, including for screening and early detection.

15:00 - 15:05: Introduction

15:05 - 15:15: Migration routes and their health hazardsThis talk will focus on common routes of migration with evolving patterns of health hazards en route and in detention, and the access to basic services and healthcare. It will set the scene to gain better understanding about differential tuberculosis epidemiologies within the context of migration.
Dominik Zenner

15:15 - 15:25: IOM’s migration health assessment programmesMigration health assessments (MHAs) are one of the International Organization for Migration's (IOM) most well-established migration management services. At the request of receiving country governments, IOM provides migrants with physical and mental health evaluations for the purpose of assisting them with resettlement, international employment, obtainment of temporary or permanent visas, or enrolment in specific migrant assistance programmes. This presentation will outline the MHAs and how the clinics and tuberculosis laboratories have been repurposed in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic.
Christopher Gilpin

15:25 - 15:35: Influence of the migration route on TB epidemiology in Israel: PH Tel AvivThis talk will review the tuberculosis epidemiology of Israel-bound migrants from the horn of Africa, comparing those who were airlifted from Ethiopia and those who made a land journey from Eritrea or Sudan. This talk will use screening and follow-up data from the Israeli programmes, which screened almost 200,000 persons over several decades.
Zohar Mor

15:35 - 15:45: How can we make TB screening for migrants patient-centred? (Dr Matt Burman and Dr Jess Potter)The talk will be co-presented by Matt Burman and Jess Potter. It will consider whether our current models of care for tuberculosis (TB) screening provide a patient-centred approach for migrants and what impact this has on patient experience and health outcomes. The talk will take both a patient-perspective, using recent research in India to understand access to TB screening along the migratory journey to the UK, and a programmatic-perspective using data from a community-based latent TB infection screening and treatment programme in East London.
Matt Burman

15:45 - 15:55: Influence of the migration route on TB epidemiology: how the TB incidence of Netherlands-bound migrants comparesThis talk will provide an overview of descriptive epidemiology of tuberculosis (TB) in migrants in relation to their duration of stay in the Netherlands. It will show the dynamics of migrants developing TB. In 2019, one out of six patients in the Netherlands was born Eritrean and almost all came to the Netherlands as an asylum seeker. The talk will also demonstrate the use of whole genome sequencing in identifying pre-migration outbreaks. Lastly, the talk will discuss interventions to early identify and prevent TB in different migrant groups.
Gerard De Vries

15:55 - 16:20: Q&A session

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SP-37-Strategies for addressing barriers for LGBTQIA in accessing high quality TB care: a comparative analysis with HIV
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SP-37-Strategies for addressing barriers for LGBTQIA in accessing high quality TB care: a comparative analysis with HIV
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A key gap in tuberculosis (TB) strategies globally has been a lack of attention to LGBTQIA populations. Given that the LGBTQIA community is marginalised, at a higher risk of HIV, more likely to have unstable income, food insecurity and poor housing, it also puts them at higher risk of TB. Combining lived experiences, participative approaches and experiences of HIV care across the UK, South Africa and India, this session examines the inherent barriers and exclusion LGBTQI persons face, and how these act as a barrier to accessing care. It draws lessons from these cross country experiences to address these in TB care.

16:45 - 16:50: Introduction

16:50 - 17:03: Barriers LGBTQIA persons face in accessing HIV care: lessons for TBThis presentation will identify the barriers faced by LGBTQIA in accessing HIV care and examine why these barriers exist. It will also throw light on the systemic exclusion of LGBTQIA persons from programmes meant for them. It will identify clear systemic barriers and challenges and how these affect the health and wellbeing of these populations. It will also examine how to address these barriers and exclusion in the context of tuberculosis care. 
Gautam Yadav

17:03 - 17:16: Why those at risk need to define the care they need: lessons on inclusion for health systems from HIV for TB careThis presentation will discuss the impact of excluding LGBTQIA persons from the framing of healthcare policies and interventions. It will explain why inclusion by health systems is necessary. It will then examine the best practices and gaps in the health system in bringing about inclusion of LGBTQIA persons in defining HIV care in diverse countries. Contrasting these experiences, and also outcomes, it will then draw lessons to see how health systems can make the framing of future tuberculosis (TB) care interventions and the implementation of current TB care interventions more inclusive.
Rudrani Chettri

17:16 - 17:29: A health systems and medical perspective on providing HIV care to LGBTQIA persons and the lessons for TBThis presentation will identify the gaps in the health system that create challenges for doctors in providing quality HIV care to LGBTQIA persons. It will talk about the impact of medical abuse on LGBTQIA persons. It will look at how the health system address the medical abuse faced by LGBTQIA persons. It will examine, by drawing lessons from the HIV experience for tuberculosis (TB) care, the role of health systems, medical community and sensitisation in providing quality care to LGBTQIA affected by TB. 




Anastacia Tomson

17:29 - 17:42: The Indian and South African experience of legal activism on LGBTQIA right to health: lessons for TB careThis presentation will examine the role of legal activism in securing a better realisation of the right to health and resulting better quality care for LGBTQIA persons. It will engage in a comparative analysis of current, and previous efforts, in legal activism on LGBTQIA right to health and quality in India and South Africa in contexts such as HIV, identifying the gaps, challenges and best practices. It will conclude by drawing lessons for making tuberculosis (TB) care more inclusive and effective in addressing rights-based barriers to health for LGBTQIA persons, especially in high burden TB countries.
Jayna Kothari

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E-posters
EP33-Barriers in the TB care cascade: it's time for local solutions
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EP33-Barriers in the TB care cascade: it's time for local solutions
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All E-posters are accessible via the "E-posters" section of the conference platform until 30 November.

EP33-414-24-Barriers to care-seeking for TB in the Philippines: a qualitative study through the lens of behavioural scienceThrough the lens of behavioural science, qualitative research was conducted on care-seeking in communities with high prevalence of tuberculosis (TB) in the Philippines. Through interviews with people affected by TB, community members and health providers, the study investigated behavioural barriers to care-seeking faced by individuals experiencing symptoms suggestive of TB.
Emily Zimmerman

EP33-415-24-Does exposure to TB meetings, either small or large groups, improve the knowledge and health-seeking behaviour for early TB diagnosis? Experience from Bengaluru and HyderabadCommunity health workers conducted small, and large, group communication activities under Tuberculosis Health Action Learning Initiative (THALI), funded by the United States Agency for International Development, in two metro cities. Evaluation of the effect of these activities to improve the knowledge and health-seeking behaviours for tuberculosis.   
RAJARAM Potty

EP33-416-24-Community engagement activities reduce patient delays in TB diagnosis and treatment initiation in Bengaluru and Hyderabad cities, South IndiaWe conducted community engagement activities through trained community health workers in two metro cities in Southern India. The study highlighted the effect of these activities in improving the early diagnosis and treatment among tuberculosis patients accessing public health services.  
RAJARAM Potty

EP33-417-24-Provision of peer support by TB survivors to people with TB through the TB programme in India: successes, challenges and the way forwardIn-depth interviews were done to understand successes and challenges in provision of peer support by trained tuberculosis (TB) champions through the United States Agency for International Development's Call to Action project. Though the programme expressed need for more TB champions, there were varied levels of support to implementation. Orientation of programme staff would be required for institutionalisation of peer support.
Raghini Ranganathan

EP33-418-24-Addressing stigma in people living with drug-resistant TB in India: photovoice studyThis intervention explores the provision of Photovoice to understand multidrug-resistant TB-related stigma. Embedded within participatory action research, nine female patients at an Médecins Sans Frontières project in Mumbai, used Photovoice to understand their lived experiences of stigma and gauge the efficacy of it as a tool for alleviating stigmatic pain.
Tahiya Mahbub

EP33-419-24-Perceptions about TB and perceived TB-related stigma and associated factors among the mining community in EswatiniPerceptions about tuberculosis (TB) and factors associated with perceived TB-related stigma among the mining community in Eswatini, were assessed using a cross-sectional, descriptive, quantitative study design. The mining community perceives TB as very serious and expressed stigmatising thoughts, associated with age, period of stay in an area and certain geographical areas.
Charles Maibvise

EP33-420-24-Cost related to diagnosis and care endured by multidrug-resistant TB patients in a reference hospital in Cameroon: a transversal exploration.A preliminary part of a more complete study evaluates the costs that multidrug-resistant tuberculosis patients and their families, in a low-middle income country in Central Africa, endure when diagnosed and treated with a standardised, short course treatment regimen. More than 75% of the patients had catastrophic costs.  
Rikiatou Fandie

EP33-421-24-Coverage of health insurance schemes among Myanmar migrants with TB in a border area of Thailand and its associated factors: an interim analysisMigrants are vulnerable and important for tuberculosis (TB) control. Less than half of migrants with TB had health insurance (the focus was on documented migrants who are secured in working and living life). Strengthening health insurance among migrants is important to improve access to health services.
Myo Minn Oo

EP33-422-24-Social support for TB patients living in extreme poverty: experience from BangladeshSocial support overcomes the economic, geographical, sociocultural and health system barriers for tuberculosis (TB) patients, especially those who are living below the poverty line. Financial support for ultra-poor patients saves them from the catastrophic healthcare cost, which also ensures treatment adherence and a better outcome.
Sardar Munim Ibna Mohsin

EP33-423-24-Gender-wise differentials in coverage of social protection schemeGender differentials exist in the coverage of nutritional support incentives in the community. Understanding the social and cultural factors responsible for the differences would be crucial in ensuring gender-responsive services to all tuberculosis patients.
Deepak Balasubramanian

EP33-424-24-A nationwide survey of cross-border referral assistance (or lack thereof) for TB patients in JapanAdequate and effective referral for tuberculosis (TB) patients crossing national borders is critical in ensuring continuity of care, yet remains overlooked. We conducted a cross-sectional, nationwide survey to explore the situation of foreign-born TB patients, who are leaving Japan while still on treatment, and highlighted some issues.
Lisa Kawatsu

EP33-425-24-Barriers to TB preventive therapy initiation in people living with HIV in Cambodia: patients and clinicians perspectiveWe assessed barriers to tuberculosis preventive therapy (TPT) from people living with HIV and healthcare workers, in Cambodia, through focus group discussions. Side effects, adherence challenges and treatment duration with six months isoniazid, were the main barriers. Training, counselling and better tolerated, shorter regimens may improve TPT coverage.
Marion MORA

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SP-47-Youth mobilisation to boost the fight to End TB
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SP-47-Youth mobilisation to boost the fight to End TB
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In 2019, the World Health Organization (WHO) launched the 1+1 initiative; calling for youth mobilisation to boost the fight to End TB. At the first ever Global Youth Town Hall on Ending TB, over 200 youth pledged their commitment by adopting the Youth Declaration to End TB. This declaration outlines key areas where youth can contribute: increasing awareness, fighting stigma and discrimination, patient support, increasing innovation, funding, and multisectoral action. In this session, we present innovative ideas and experiences to operationalise these commitments. The presentations will be informed by a WHO online consultation that delivers innovative solutions through the creativity and diversity of global youth.

15:00 - 15:05: Introduction

15:05 - 15:15: Mobilising young people as powerful advocates to end TBDespite being the world’s top infectious killer, awareness about tuberculosis (TB) is poor, especially among young people who are among those most affected. Information campaigns, peer education and community mobilisation, through social media and in-person, are some ways that Madhusudan has reached thousands of young people. In this presentation he talks about what he has learnt about educating, mobilising and motivating young people to become leading voices in the fight to end TB. He also presents the results of the online consultation, which take these learnings and applies them to new and innovative approaches for reaching young people.
Madhusudan Kaphle

15:15 - 15:25: Making solidarity infectious: how young people can fight stigma and discrimination against people with TBPeople with tuberculosis (TB) face immense stigma and discrimination that can hamper their access to care, as well as their psychosocial wellbeing. While young people are traditionally social justice champions, what role can they play in raising awareness and fighting stigma for TB patients?  Paran looks at this from her personal experience as a TB survivor and advocate, as well as experiences collected from around the world and through the online consultation.
Paran Sarimita Winarni

15:25 - 15:35: Not just diagnostics and medicines: how young people can support those with TB through treatment and recoveryPeople with tuberculosis (TB) face a challenging recovery period and need psychosocial and socioeconomic support to complete their treatment and lead fulfilling lives after surviving the disease. How can young people contribute to this? Funke Dosumu, a TB survivor and advocate, looks at the role each young person can play in supporting TB patients, including using new digital tools to respond better to this need.
Funke Dosumu

15:35 - 15:45: Getting invested: young people’s role in bringing all of society on board and increasing funding to end TBHow do you bring society to take ownership of its tuberculosis (TB) response – addressing not only the healthcare aspects, but the social determinants of the disease? Along with the ministry of health, how do we include other ministries such as for disabilities, for women and child health, for education, for labour, for finance in the response? How do we involve local governments, mobilise the private sector and activate civil society? Hai will speak about an all-of-society approach to ending TB, building on experience from Viet Nam, as well as an international stage and the online consultation.
Hai Nguyen

15:45 - 16:20: Q&A session

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